Pros and Cons of Dentures

Whether your teeth are stained, crooked, or missing, flawed teeth can keep you from smiling, laughing, and talking freely. Your confidence takes a hit and causes a ripple effect of problems, including isolation, disengagement, even depression

At OK Tooth in Midtown Manhattan, New York, our experienced team specializes in general and cosmetic dentistry, periodontistry, and endodontistry. We help people overcome their smile-related confidence problems by providing the tools to prevent and treat dental problems and delivering innovative cosmetic dentistry solutions that will have you grinning from ear to ear.

One of our time-honored treatments, dentures, solves the problem of missing teeth by restoring function and aesthetics. It’s not your only option, but it is one of the most affordable and accessible treatments available for closing tooth gaps. Here are the pros and cons of dentures.

The pros of wearing dentures

Dentures are removable appliances you place in your mouth to replace missing teeth. If you’re missing all of your teeth, full dentures replace the upper and lower arch of your mouth. If you’re only missing a few teeth, you can get partial dentures that snap onto neighboring teeth with a metal bracket.

People have been wearing dentures in some form or another for centuries, but acrylic dentures as people know them today came on the scene in the 20th century. Of course, technological advancements continue to improve the durability and appearance of these oral appliances, but the main premise remains the same: replacing lost teeth. 

Modern-day dentures are an excellent choice because they are:

Affordable

Your insurance company may pay for all, part, or none of your denture treatment. If you have to dip into your own pocket for any portion, then price is certainly a factor in your decision. Dentures are considered one of the most affordable solutions for missing teeth.

Quick

Depending on the type of dentures you need, we can typically design, create, and place your dentures in 2-6 weeks. While that may not be as instant as you’d like, it’s pretty quick compared to the alternatives. For example, it can take up to six months to complete the entire process of getting dental implants, maybe more if you need a bone graft.

Natural-looking

We custom-design your dentures to match your healthy teeth, so most people can’t tell you're wearing them. 

Supportive

One of the main reasons you shouldn’t ignore missing teeth is that the loss eventually affects the structure of your face. Your cheeks sink into the area where your teeth once were, and your jaw and facial muscles weaken. Dentures may have a reputation for being a solution for older folks, but those who wear them shave years off their looks.

Functional

Gaps in your teeth, especially if you’re missing several or all of them, cause significant chewing problems that can lead to digestive issues and malnutrition. Dentures allow you to eat a wide variety of foods.

Cons of wearing dentures

For all the good that comes from wearing dentures, we want to disclose what some patients consider the downsides of getting dentures so you’re fully informed when you make your decision.

Adjustment period

Dentures feel foreign until you get used to them. Expect to spend some time relearning to eat confidently and speak clearly while wearing your dentures. Our team can give you some practical tips to ease the transition.

Impaired taste

Although you can eat while wearing your dentures, you may notice that food doesn’t taste the same. That’s because your dentures may cover the roof of your mouth, also known as your palate, which can hinder your ability to taste fully.

Temporary solution

Dentures last a long time, but they’re not permanent. Most dentures can last about 5-7 years, but as you age and your facial structure changes, you’ll need to have adjustments made or get a new set.

Slippage

Because dentures are removable, they are also moveable in your mouth. Until you get used to their tendency to shift a bit, you may notice that they slip in and out of position or even pop out of your mouth. Most wearers learn how to overcome this issue, and modern dentures are far less problematic than their predecessors.

Cleaning

To clean your dentures, you remove them from your mouth and use a specially formulated solution to remove plaque and bacteria. After cleaning your dentures, you also have to clean any remaining natural teeth and your gums, so your daily routine may take a few more steps.

Now that you know the pros and cons of dentures, you’re better equipped to make a decision for your own oral health. But you don’t have to do it alone.

Visit OK Tooth to talk with one of our experts. We guide you through your options and answer all of your questions. When you’re ready for dentures, we’re here with you every step of the way. To schedule an appointment, use our handy online booking tool or call us today.

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